PLAY SORCERER 36: The Value of Situation

Sorcerer_Cover

The Kicker is one of the reasons you can assume that the you needn’t worry building some sort of “plot” to get a story.

Remember, though I begging you, the Players, to have your Characters do the most interesting, the most compelling, the most emotionally true things you can think of having their Characters do (and I’m begging the Game Master to step back and let them do this), remember that you are doing these thing—these actions, these words—in the context of situation.

Without situation, all the entertaining behavior in he world is just a circus routine—entertaining, involving, perhaps. But not going anywhere.

Situation is what changes that.

Situation is the impetus for making your Characters do the most interesting, the most compelling, the most emotionally true things you can think of having their Characters do. It’s an impetus because your Character must make a decision about how to behave—what to say, what to do. A situation implies that your Character wants something. What that something is always is up to you. Sometimes the choices are presented literally, sometimes they are implied, and sometimes you’ll come up with something your Character wants—in the moment, on the spot—that no other player at the table could have anticipated you having your Character go for a moment before.

For example, your Character charges into a crack house to rescue your husband from a sorcerer drug dealer holding him hostage. The dealer’s demon, a behemoth of a creature, smashes through the wall, smoke rolling off its thick skin, the dealer no where in sight.

Now, what does your Character want?

  • To find her husband.
  • To defeat the demon?
  • To banish the demon?
  • To live?
  • To get the hell out of there before the Demon kicks her ass?
  • To find the dealer and take him down before doing anything else?

Your Character might want one or all of these things. But in that moment the Character is going to have to make a decision. And if you make it with passion and commitment and emotional honesty it’s going to be a great, entertaining part of a story.

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